Charlemagne: the Stolen History

The Dark Secret

Elisabeth de Moreau d’Andoy

We have always been told that Charlemagne (742-814), the Frank Germanic Emperor of Western and Central Europe, who is considered the father of modern Western Europe, was based in Germany.

His family was not based in Germany, but in Gallia Belgica, which is today’s Belgium.

The headquarters of his empire, the mythical Aquisgranum is supposed to be the town of Aachen/Aix-la-Chapelle, in Germany.

1,500,000 tourists go to Aachen every year to see Charlemagne’s grave. However, the underground tomb described by the Latin texts has never been found.

But it is not the only thing that was not found. There is no real archaeological trace of his palace or his capital city, New Rome, in Aachen.

If you ask a guide where Charlemagne’s palace was, you will be told that it was under the city hall. Now, the city hall stands on the other side of the big square, too far away from the cathedral to be connected with an elevated wooden corridor, as indeed it was during the days of the Carolingians.

Instead of a Carolingian chapel, we are presented with a gothic cathedral.

The first chapel built by Charlemagne’s father, Pepin the Short, has not been found.

Where are the Frank military camps, the permanent camp, Campum Longum and Campo Maggio, where Charlemagne’s army used to gather for the year’s campaign?

Where are his familly member’s mausoleums?

I stumbled, by chance, across the mother of all secrets.

The Middle Ages are often called the Dark Ages because lots of things from that time simply do not add up. I tell in my book how I discovered that there is an excellent reason why they don’t.

My second book is out. It is called “Charlemagne la contre-histoire” and is published in France by the publisher Edilivre
http://www.edilivre.com
http://www.edilivre.com/edilivre/presentation/notre-histoire
It is the result of an 8-years research.
The English translation is in progress.

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About Elisabeth de Moreau d'Andoy

Elisabeth de Moreau d'Andoy is a French mothertongue professional trilingual translator, turned writer when she discovered that the history of the Middle Ages we know today is really a hoax. She has worked six years on her first book: "Charlemagne: The Stolen History"
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4 Responses to Charlemagne: the Stolen History

  1. I need to to thank you for this fantastic read!
    ! I definitely loved every little bit of it. I have got you bookmarked to
    look at new stuff you post…

    • Sorry for the late answer. I am afraid I am doing myself these 3 sites I have in the 3 languages I am speaking, and it takes a while to understand how it works…
      I am very happy you liked my site, and the story I am telling.
      My book is out French and Italian. The Italians are going absolutely wild.
      The English translation is in progress.
      I was contacted by a German lady doctor who came to see some of the bistorical buildings I am talking about. She studied medecine at the university of Aachen. Told me that finally somebody is saying the truth.
      Am going on with my research and have already written 200 pages.
      it will be as shocking as the 1st one.
      Cheers,
      Elisabeth

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